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Seretide: The Medication You Need for Asthma and COPD

Table of Contents

Seretide is a combination inhaler medication used to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It contains two different medications: salmeterol and fluticasone propionate.

What is salmeterol?

Salmeterol is a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA). It works by opening up the airways in the lungs, making it easier to breathe. Salmeterol is a preventive medication, meaning it is taken on a regular basis to prevent asthma attacks and COPD exacerbations.

Seretide: The Medication You Need for Asthma and COPD
Seretide: The Medication You Need for Asthma and COPD

What is fluticasone propionate?

Fluticasone propionate is a corticosteroid. Corticosteroids reduce inflammation in the airways, which can help to improve symptoms and lung function. Fluticasone propionate is also a preventive medication, but it can also be used to treat asthma attacks and COPD exacerbations.

How does Seretide work?

Seretide works by combining the effects of salmeterol and fluticasone propionate to provide both long-term and short-term relief of asthma and COPD symptoms.

  • Salmeterol: Salmeterol opens up the airways in the lungs, making it easier to breathe. It works by attaching to beta2-receptors in the airways and causing them to relax. This widens the airways and makes it easier for air to flow in and out of the lungs.
  • Fluticasone propionate: Fluticasone propionate reduces inflammation in the airways. It works by attaching to glucocorticoid receptors in the airways and suppressing the release of inflammatory chemicals. This can help to improve symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath.

Benefits of Seretide

Seretide can offer a number of benefits to people with asthma and COPD, including:

  • Improved symptom control: Seretide can help to improve asthma and COPD symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness.
  • Reduced risk of asthma attacks and COPD exacerbations: Seretide can help to reduce the risk of asthma attacks and COPD exacerbations, which can lead to hospitalization.
  • Improved lung function: Seretide can help to improve lung function, making it easier to breathe and exercise.

Dose

SERETIDE Inhaler is for inhalation only.
Patients should be made aware that SERETIDE Inhaler must be used regularly foroptimum benefit, even when asymptomatic.

Patients must be warned not to stop therapy or reduce it without medical advice, even if they feel better on SERETIDE.
Patients should be regularly reassessed by a doctor, so that the strength of SERETIDE they are receiving remains optimal and is only changed on medical advice.

The dose should be titrated to the lowest dose at which effective control of symptoms is maintained. Where effective control of symptoms is maintained with the lowest strength of the SERETIDE inhaler (25 mcg/50 mcg) given twice daily, the next step could include a test of inhaled corticosteroid alone. As an alternative, patients requiring a long-acting beta-2 agonist could be titrated to SERETIDE given once daily if, in the opinion of the prescriber, it would be adequate to maintain disease control.

In the event of once daily dosing when the patient has a history of nocturnal symptoms, the dose should be given at night; and when the patient has a history of mainly day-time symptoms, the dose should be given in the morning.
Regular review of patients as treatment is stepped down is important.

Asthma

Patients should be given the strength of SERETIDE containing the appropriate fluticasone propionate dosage for the severity of their disease.

Patients should be instructed not to take additional doses to treat symptoms but to take
a short-acting inhaled beta-2 agonist.

Adults and adolescents 12 years and older:
Two inhalations of 25 mcg salmeterol and 50 mcg fluticasone propionate twice daily

OR

Two inhalations of 25 mcg salmeterol and 125 mcg fluticasone propionate twice daily.

OR

Two inhalations of 25 mcg salmeterol and 250 mcg fluticasone propionate twice daily.

Paediatric population

Children 4 years and older:
Two inhalations of 25 mcg salmeterol and 50 mcg fluticasone propionate twice daily.

Children under 4 years of age:
There are insufficient clinical data at present to recommend use of SERETIDE inchildren aged under 4 years.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

2 inhalations of 25 mcg/125 mcg twice daily.
For patients who require additional symptomatic control replace the 25 mcg/125 mcg strength with the 25 mcg/250 mcg strength.
The maximum daily dose is 2 inhalations 25 mcg/250 mcg twice daily.

Overdosage

The available information on overdose with SERETIDE, salmeterol and/or fluticasone propionate is given as follows: The expected symptoms and signs of salmeterol overdosage are those typical of excessive beta-2-adrenergic stimulation, including tremor, headache, tachycardia, increases in systolic blood pressure, hypokalaemia and (for Accuhaler only )raised blood glucose levels.
Acute inhalation of fluticasone propionate doses in excess of those approved may lead to temporary suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This does not usually require emergency action as normal adrenal function typically recovers within a few days.
If higher than approved doses of SERETIDE are continued over prolonged periods, significant adrenocortical suppression is possible. There have been very rare reports of acute adrenal crisis, mainly occurring in children exposed to higher than approved doses over prolonged periods (several months or years); observed features have included hypoglycaemia associated with decreased consciousness and/or convulsions. Situations which could potentially trigger acute adrenal crisis include exposure to trauma, surgery, infection or any rapid reduction in the dosage of the inhaled fluticasone propionate component.
Additional systemic corticosteroid cover should be considered during periods of stress or elective surgery.
It is not recommended that patients receive higher than approved doses of SERETIDE. It is important to review therapy regularly and titrate down to the lowest approved dose at which effective control of disease is maintained (see Dosage & Administration).
Treatment: There is no specific treatment for an overdose of salmeterol and fluticasone propionate. If overdose occurs, the patients should be treated supportively with appropriate monitoring as necessary.

How to use Seretide

Seretide is available in two different inhaler devices: Seretide Accuhaler and Seretide Diskus. The instructions for using each device are different, so it is important to read the patient information leaflet that comes with your inhaler before using it.

Seretide Accuhaler

To use the Seretide Accuhaler:

  1. Hold the Accuhaler horizontally with your thumb on the thumb grip.
  2. Open the cover by pushing the thumb grip around until it clicks.
  3. Slide the lever down until it clicks. The medicine is now loaded.
  4. Breathe out gently away from the mouthpiece.
  5. Place your mouth over the mouthpiece and breathe in deeply and steadily through your mouth.
  6. Remove the Accuhaler from your mouth and hold your breath for 10 seconds.
  7. Close the Accuhaler.

Seretide Diskus

To use the Seretide Diskus:

  1. Hold the Diskus upright with the mouthpiece facing down.
  2. Slide the lever back until it clicks. The medicine is now loaded.
  3. Breathe out gently away from the mouthpiece.
  4. Place your mouth over the mouthpiece and breathe in deeply and steadily through your mouth.
  5. Remove the Diskus from your mouth and hold your breath for 10 seconds.
  6. Close the Diskus.

Side effects of Seretide

The most common side effects of Seretide are mild and go away on their own. These side effects can include:

  • Headache
  • Throat irritation
  • Hoarseness
  • Cough
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle aches
  • Upset stomach

Less common side effects of Seretide can include:

  • Thrush
  • Yeast infections
  • Bronchospasm
  • Tachycardia
  • Palpitations
  • Tremor
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataracts

Who can take Seretide?

Seretide can be taken by adults and children over the age of 4 years.

Adults

Seretide is used to treat asthma and COPD in adults.

Children

Seretide is used to treat asthma in children over the age of 4 years. It is not used to treat COPD in children.

Who should not take Seretide?

You should not take Seretide if you are allergic to salmeterol, fluticasone propionate, or any of the other ingredients in the inhaler. You should also not take Seretide if you have an uncontrolled heart condition or high blood pressure.

Interactions with other medications

Seretide can interact with other medications, so it is important to tell your doctor about all of the medications you are taking before you start taking Seretide. Some medications that can interact with Seretide include:

  • Beta-blockers: Beta-blockers are medications that are used to treat high blood pressure and heart problems. They can interact with Seretide and cause side effects such as chest tightness, wheezing, and rapid heartbeat.
  • Diuretics: Diuretics are medications that are used to remove excess fluid from the body. They can interact with Seretide and increase the risk of side effects such as low potassium levels.
  • MAO inhibitors: MAO inhibitors are medications that are used to treat depression. They can interact with Seretide and cause side effects such as high blood pressure and headache.

Seretide and pregnancy

Seretide is safe to take during pregnancy, but it is important to talk to your doctor before starting to take it.

Seretide and breastfeeding

Seretide is safe to take while breastfeeding.

Seretide and alcohol

There are no known interactions between Seretide and alcohol. However, it is important to talk to your doctor about drinking alcohol while taking Seretide, as alcohol can worsen asthma and COPD symptoms.

Seretide and driving

Seretide is not likely to affect your ability to drive. However, some of the side effects of Seretide, such as dizziness and blurred vision, can affect your ability to drive. If you experience any of these side effects, you should not drive.

Seretide alternatives

There are a number of other medications that can be used to treat asthma and COPD. Some alternatives to Seretide include:

  • Other combination inhalers: There are a number of other combination inhalers that contain different combinations of LABAs and corticosteroids. These inhalers can be just as effective as Seretide for treating asthma and COPD.
  • Single-ingredient inhalers: There are also a number of single-ingredient inhalers that can be used to treat asthma and COPD. These inhalers can be just as effective as Seretide for some people, but they may not be as effective for others.

Frequently asked questions Seretide

Can I take Seretide with other asthma or COPD medications?

A: Yes, you can take Seretide with other asthma or COPD medications. However, it is important to talk to your doctor about which medications you should take and how to take them.

How long will it take for Seretide to start working?

A: Seretide will start working to open up your airways within a few minutes of taking it. However, it may take several weeks or months to see the full benefits of Seretide, such as improved symptom control and reduced risk of asthma attacks and COPD exacerbations.

How often should I take Seretide?

A: The usual dose of Seretide is two puffs twice a day. However, your doctor may prescribe a different dose depending on your individual needs.

What should I do if I forget to take a dose of Seretide?

A: If you forget to take a dose of Seretide, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed dose.

Can I overdose on Seretide?

A: It is unlikely that you will overdose on Seretide if you take it as prescribed by your doctor. However, if you do overdose on Seretide, you may experience side effects such as headache, dizziness, rapid heartbeat, and chest tightness. If you experience any of these side effects, you should seek medical attention immediately.

What should I do if I have side effects from Seretide?

A: If you have side effects from Seretide, talk to your doctor. Some side effects of Seretide are mild and go away on their own. However, other side effects can be more serious and may require medical treatment.

Conclusion

Seretide is a combination inhaler medication that is used to treat asthma and COPD. It works by combining the effects of a LABA and a corticosteroid to provide both long-term and short-term relief of asthma and COPD symptoms. Seretide is generally safe and effective, but it is important to talk to your doctor about whether Seretide is right for you.

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